Mining mit Grafikkarten: Ethereum und Bitcon schürfen ...

Struggle bussin' with some choices

I have a 1080 and am looking to upgrade since the prices are pretty sexy. Currently looking at rx 5700 xt vs a 2070 super or maybe a 2080 (though not really as the price range is still higher than I would like for not much more performance) It looks like those cards are comparable but depending on what site I look at they are either rated the same or the rx has better textures and the 2070 super has better lighting (mostly due to ray tracing). Now I hear Ray Tracing is a gimmic but I am not sure if legit or from Radeon fanbois or grumpy people who can't affort nvidia products (because they are pricey as hell damn bitcoin). All I care about is high res performace and visuals, I am trying to get my pc to super sexy status for Cyberpunk 2077 and ray tracing looks like it will provide the best visuals for me and all that would be left to get is a better hd monitor. So let me know what you have found out or if I should wait for the 5800 to drop I believe the rumor is this weekend?
THANKS!
submitted by 0nignarkill to graphicscard [link] [comments]

The Xbox One X, Teraflops, and the GTX 1070

With the Xbox One X (Scorpio) on the horizon I've heard a lot of talk about teraflops and how the One X will perform the same as a 1070 because they are close in terms of teraflops. I'm going to try and shed some light on the subject.
First off, what is a teraflop? Well, it's a measure of floating point operations per second. Or in layman's terms "how fast a GPU can do math." So that means higher numbers are better, right? The higher the number the faster the device can add, subtract and multiply numbers.
Well not exactly. Teraflops are really only a good measurement of performance if you're only running complex math and doing nothing else (think bitcoin mining or physics simulations).
For example: The rx 480 has 5.8 Tflops and is a pretty capable GPU. However, the 980Ti only has 5.6 Tflops. Now wait a second. The 980Ti wrecks the 480 in any gaming benchmark. How come a GPU with a lower Teraflop rating can outperform one with a higher rating?
To quote EuroGamer:
Teraflops are a very basic measure of computational power, separate and distinct from all other aspects of GPU design.
Teraflops really have very little to do with gaming performance, because there are lots of other things that impact gaming performance (vRAM bandwidth, cache, etc).
In short, the Xbox One X probably won't perform on the same level as a 1070. The One X has 6 Tflops, but seeing how the 480/580 (which is very similar to the One X's GPU) stacks up against the 1070 we can't reasonably expect the One X to do much better.
*Edit: Of course the Xbox isn't out yet, so have really have no idea on how it performs until it gets in the hands of Digital Foundry (or similar channel) who has the ability to analyze it's performance in. And just to touch on Forza, the only it was running at 1080p60 on the OG One was with the dynamic resolution and settings. I suspect that will be implemented on the One X with Forza 7.
submitted by XtremeCookie to pcmasterrace [link] [comments]

So I finally gave Honeyminer a try. (my personal semi-review)

This review was last updated 11-30-18
When I first was interested in trying this program I couldn't find anything about it. it seems a lot of people were too scared to try it since their is like no information about it other then from the web page itself. to be honest I was a bit scared to try it. I've tried many other software of this kind, on a "test" machine I'm not afraid to lose on a secondary network and router... incase its a scam or gonna give me a virus and I suggest anyone installing mining software do the same as a rule of thumb. please keep in mind the software is still relatively new and they are working to improve it still. They seem to be hiring as well if your interested in helping them grow by working for them look near the bottom for their contact e-mail. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________
This review is for the windows version of Honyminer Because its still relatively new I knew could go one of two ways "sacm software" like most every mobile mining app or even quite a few desktop ones - Or legit. I'm glad to say after using it for a month it seems legit. I was able to withdraw from it no problem. If your system is really crappy It might not work that well on your computer or mining rig. There are no ads and the program doesn't seem to disrupt any day to day activity at least not on my main system, however you can of course expect increased heat production of your system as with any mining software, adequate cooling is important in mining. Anyways Honyminer is as close to an easy one click mining software as I have come. they seem to be making a "pro" version too for more hardcore miners. They do take a fee which is to be expected *look near the bottom for fee information\* but that fee goes down significantly if you have multiple GPU's mining.. The good thing about it for me was it let me kind of set my rig to "autopilot" so to speak. If you wish to see the H/s numbers in real time, go to you settings and view the "expert logs" which will also tell what coin is being mined at the time ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Pros
Pro and or con (depending on how you look at it)
Cons:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
COMPATIBILITY: (sorry it keeps adding asterisks to the card model for no reason)
WORKED ON: every nvidia card tested so far with card models dating back from 20014 to now..
Worked on some surprising low end and or old CPU and GPUs. like the
AMD Radeon R9 380 card in addition to a AMD Athlon II X3 450 Processor and it mines just fine.. of course that processor doesn't make much on its own lol.. but thats an extra 2 or 3 cents per day by itself. I've also tested it with an i3, i2 Most AMD cards worked but I ran into issues with a few so maybe it's easier for me to just tell you what did not work.
DID NOT WORK ON:
--- any of the AMD ATI Radeon HD 4250's tested so far (2) that particular card It didn't work at all for mining like never enabled the gpu but the cpu on that machine did work however it would generate an "error" on start up but otherwise did not disrupt the mining on that system except if I turned on idle earning mode, I would get a bunch of errors as it was trying to access the GPU. we need the functionality to enable or disable hardware individually I think. (errors or no errors it just seems like a good thing to have.)
OR a system that had both a AMD Radeon R7 Graphics and a AMD A8-7650K Radeon R7, (4C+6G) which surprised me considering some of the things that did work lol... but I think it might just might be that one system, but either way can't vouch that it will work. That system was pre-built and wont allow the parts to be changed or easily removed to be worth the effort since I have to use it for other things so unfortunately I can't test these on another mainboard at least not with wasting some time, money and patients that Id rather dedicate elsewhere for now.
I had some issues using one RX Vega 56 card but i think it's was just that card because another one did work just fine.________________________________________________________________________
FEES W/ comparison to nicehash
I'm not sure if this post will be helpful to anyone looking into this software or anyone whos looking to try a different mining software but if it dose great.
-- nicehash charges the following fees as far as "selling/mining" or withdrawing.
Payouts for balances less than 0.1 to external wallet 5%
Payouts for balances greater than or equal to 0.1 BTC to external wallet 3%
Payouts for balances greater than or equal to 0.001 BTC to NiceHash wallet 2%
Withdrawal fees from NiceHash wallet
Withdrawals from NiceHash wallet are subjected to the withdrawal fee, which depends on the withdrawn amount and withdrawal option.
WITHDRAWAL OPTION AMOUNT TO WITHDRAW FEE Any BTC wallet From 0.002 (min) to 0.05 BTC 0.0001 BTC
Any BTC wallet More than 0.05 BTC 0.2% of withdrawn amount
Coinbase More than 0.001 BTC FREE - No fee. but they also say Minimum Coinbase withdrawal limit is adjusted dynamically according to the API overload._____________________________________________________________________________
honyminer fees are based on number of GPU's working.
8% for 1 GPU or for 2 GPUs or more the fee is 2.5%.
The only withdrawal fee is the standard BTC transaction fee that bitcoin charges and it doesn't go to honyminer. When they add the other withdrawal functions that fee cam be avoided I suppose.
_________________________
Earnings: in comparison to nicehash
Update: sometimes software / test networks will give a view that can be off + or - a few percent compared to actual. A lot of different things can affect your earnings including where you are located in the world, I'm not sure how many of you uses more than one mining software day to day , ISP issues, crypto price fluctuation, updates to fee's, and inaccuracies in test software/networks can affect results. but I go back and forth between different ones from time to time and I think that's good practice to keep options open. I notice that honey miner seems to do better for me at night-time and early morning/afternoon is when it has the most trouble raking in the crypto's
That said I've been trying to test to see how this compares to nice hash earnings, with two of my buddies. So this is an average between the 3 of our profits vs loss compared to nice hash, I'm using a two 10 GPU/ 3 cpu setups, while one of my buddies is using two 1 gpu, 2 cpu setups and the other is using two 30 gpu mini farm's. We each have 2 networks each located relatively close by *less than .5 mile the furthest one* one with honyminer running and the other with nice hash and we are looking over 24 hour periods When all three of us have the results for one day, we average our results together. In all we will be looking over a 14 day period. UPDATE: the results below were done well long before the latest update to the software so I do not know if they have changed, Id have to do another round or perhaps some from the community could give me their results and save me a bit of work. I'm not sure when Id have the time to dig into it again. Sorry that it took me so long before I could get on here to post the results of the last few days of the tests.
Seem to be a bit smaller then nicehash at times and higher at other times. it seems to for me at least payquicker and it gets deposited in my nicehash account sooner than I expected.
hopefully when they let up pick which coin to mine on our own it may help somewhat, and any of you who want to move smaller volume will probably benefit when they add the functionality to withdraw other coin/usd.
anyways when their autopilot system works it works great but when it doesn't it's just "okay" for lack of a better word...
_____________________________________________________
Contact: they have a contact us part on their webpage and they also have a reddit page which I was made aware of from contacting them https://www.reddit.com/HoneyMine
Careers: If anyone is interested in working for them the job listings at the time of this typing were for Senior Java Developer(s) and Customer Service Representative(s) the email listed is [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]). id suggest you check their site for the requirements I just added this part to the review as a courtesy if anyone's interested its not meant to be a focus of it. But I know we have some really talented people on reddit who care about the crypto world passionately so id rather give honyminer a chance to have some of those sort on their team since it might help improve the software faster for the end users.. if that makes sense.
_________________________________________________________
UPDATE: If a question reminds me I left out something I think should have mentioned Ill try to add it here so ppl don't have to scroll all over the place.. I don't write many reviews (for anything) so I don't know if this one was any good or not but I hope it was okay.. and I'm still a new reddit user relatively. I just wanted to make this review mainly because there is next to no information on honyminer when I looked for it and maybe it can help anyone whos interested in it.
browolf2 asked Is it basically like nicehash then? :
A: In a way, its like nice hash that its cloud based, but you get paid not just when your pool completes an order. there are no "buyers" only "sellers" if you look at it that way...I hope I'm wording this the right way.. It's just straight up mining and they take their fee but compared to nicehash the fees for "mining" are different
karl0525 asked: do you know if we can contact the honeyminer dev team and see if they will communicate here on Reddit. Might give them some good ideas what us miners are looking for? Worth a try maybe? Thanks:
A: I submitted a question to their "contact us" part of their webpage and I got a reply from them, this is the message I received below:
Thank you for writing in and for your interest in Honeyminer. We always welcome feedback and suggestions from our users. We are currently planning on expanding our online and social media presence.
Please check our our Reddit page: https://www.reddit.com/HoneyMine
submitted by Joe_Cow to gpumining [link] [comments]

How do I mine Dogecoin?

How do I mine Dogecoin?
Let’s take a lucky guess that you’re here today because you’ve heard a lot about cryptocurrencies and you want to get involved, right? If you’re a community person, Dogecoin mining might be the perfect start for you!
Bitcoin was the first in 2009, and now there are hundreds of cryptocurrencies. These new coins (that operate on their own native blockchain) are called altcoins or alternative coins. One popular altcoin is Dogecoin. It can be bought, sold and traded, just like Bitcoin. It can also be mined!
So, what is Dogecoin mining?
You’ll know what hardware and what software you need to get started. You’ll also know whether or not Dogecoin mining is for you!
So, where would you like to start? The beginning? Great choice. Let’s have a quick look at how Dogecoin got started.
A (Very) Short History of Dogecoin
In 2013, an Australian named Jackson Palmer and an American named Billy Markus became friends. They became friends because they both liked cryptocurrencies. However, they also thought the whole thing was getting too serious so they decided to create their own.
Palmer and Markus wanted their coin to be more fun and more friendly than other crypto coins. They wanted people who wouldn’t normally care about crypto to get involved.
They decided to use a popular meme as their mascot — a Shiba Inu dog.

https://preview.redd.it/rymnyyz1iil31.png?width=303&format=png&auto=webp&s=f138e3fe56eef9c6b0e7f49b84fefc41fb83e5aa
Dogecoin was launched on December 6th, 2013. Since then it has become popular because it’s playful and good-natured. Just like its mascot!
Dogecoin has become well-known for its use in charitable acts and online tipping. In 2014, $50,000 worth of Dogecoin was donated to the Jamaican Bobsled Team so they could go to the Olympics. Dogecoin has also been used to build wells in Kenya. Isn’t that awesome!
Users of social platforms – like Reddit – can use Dogecoin to tip or reward each other for posting good content.
Dogecoin has the 27th largest market cap of any cryptocurrency.
Note: A market cap (or market capitalization) is the total value of all coins on the market.
So, Dogecoin is a popular altcoin, known for being fun, friendly and kind. It’s a coin with a dog on it! You love it already, don’t you?
Next, I want to talk about how mining works…
What is Mining?
To understand mining, you first need to understand how cryptocurrencies work. Cryptocurrencies are peer-to-peer digital currencies. This means that they allow money to be transferred from one person to another without using a bank.
Every cryptocurrency transaction is recorded on a huge digital database called a blockchain. The database is stored across thousands of computers called nodes. Nodes put together groups of new transactions and add them to the blockchain. These groups are called blocks.
Each block of transactions has to be checked by all the nodes on the network before being added to the blockchain. If nodes didn’t check transactions, people could pretend that they have more money than they really do (I know I would!).
Confirming transactions (mining) requires a lot of computer power and electricity so it’s quite expensive.
Blockchains don’t have paid employees like banks, so they offer a reward to users who confirm transactions. The reward for confirming new transactions is new cryptocurrency. The process of being rewarded with new currency for confirming transactions is what we call “mining”!

https://preview.redd.it/rcut2jx3iil31.png?width=598&format=png&auto=webp&s=8d78d41c764f4fe4e6386da4f40a66556a873b87
It is called mining because it’s a bit like digging for gold or diamonds. Instead of digging with a shovel for gold, you’re digging with your computer for crypto coins!
Each cryptocurrency has its own blockchain. Different ways of mining new currency are used by different coins where different rewards are offered.
So, how do you mine Dogecoin? What’s special about Dogecoin mining? Let’s see…
What is Dogecoin Mining?
Dogecoin mining is the process of being rewarded with new Dogecoin for checking transactions on the Dogecoin blockchain. Simple, right? Well no, it’s not quite that simple, nothing ever is!
Mining Dogecoin is like a lottery. To play the lottery you have to do some work. Well, actually your computer (or node) has to do some work! This work involves the confirming and checking of transactions which I talked about in the last section.
Lots of computers work on the same block of transactions at the same time but the only one can win the reward of new coins. The one that earns the new coins is the node that adds the new block of transactions to the old block of transactions. This is completed using complex mathematical equations.
The node that solves the mathematical problem first wins! It can then attach the newly confirmed block of transactions to the rest of the blockchain.
Most cryptocurrency mining happens this way. However, Dogecoin mining differs from other coins in several important areas. These areas are;
  • Algorithm: Each cryptocurrency has a set of rules for mining new currency. These rules are called a mining or hashing algorithm.
  • Block Time: This is the average length of time it takes for a new block of transactions to be checked and added to the blockchain.
  • Difficulty: This is a number that represents how hard it is to mine each new block of currency. You can use the difficulty number to work out how likely you are to win the mining lottery. Mining difficulty can go up or down depending on how many miners there are. The difficulty is also adjusted by the coin’s protocol to make sure that the block time stays the same.
  • Reward: This is the amount of new currency that is awarded to the miner of each new block.
Now, let’s compare how DogeCoin mining works compared to Litecoin and Bitcoin…
Mining Comparison
Bitcoin uses SHA-256 to guide the mining of new currency and the other two use Scrypt. This is an important difference because Scrypt mining needs a lot less power and is a lot quicker than SHA-256. This makes mining easier for miners with less powerful computers. Fans of Litecoin and Dogecoin think that they are fairer than Bitcoin because more people can mine them.
Note: In 2014, Litecoin and Dogecoin merged mining. This means they made it possible to mine both coins in the same process. Dogecoin mining is now linked with Litecoin mining. It’s like two different football teams playing home games in the same stadium!
Mining Dogecoin is a lot faster than mining Litecoin or Bitcoin. The block reward is much higher too!
Don’t get too excited though (sorry!). Dogecoin is still worth a lot less than Bitcoin and Litecoin. A reward of ten thousand Dogecoin is worth less than thirty US Dollars. A reward of 12.5 Bitcoin is currently worth 86,391.63 US Dollars!
However, it’s not as bad as it sounds. Dogecoin mining difficulty is more than one million times less than Bitcoin mining difficulty. This means you are much more likely to win the block reward when you mine Dogecoin.
Now I’ve told you about what Dogecoin mining is and how it works, would you like to give it a try?
Let’s see what you need to do to become a Dogecoin miner…
How to Mine Dogecoin
There are two ways to mine Dogecoin, solo (by yourself) or in a Dogecoin mining pool.
Note: A Dogecoin pool is a group of users who share their computing power to increase the odds of winning the race to confirm transactions. When one of the nodes in a pool confirms a transaction, it divides the reward between the users of the pool equally.
Dogecoin Mining: Solo vs Pool
When you mine as a part of a Dogecoin pool, you have to pay fees. Also, when the pool mines a block you will only receive a small portion of the total reward. However, pools mine blocks much more often than solo miners. So, your chance of earning a reward (even though it is shared) is increased. This can provide you with a steady new supply of Dogecoin.
If you choose to mine solo then you risk waiting a long time to confirm a transaction because there is a lot of competition. It could be weeks or even months before you mine your first block! However, when you do win, the whole reward will be yours. You won’t have to share it or pay any fees.
As a beginner, I would recommend joining a Dogecoin pool. This way you won’t have to wait as long to mine your first block of new currency. You’ll also feel like you’re part of the community and that’s what Dogecoin is all about!
What You Need To Start Mining Dogecoin
Before you start Dogecoin mining, you’ll need a few basics. They are;
  • A PC with either Windows, OS X or Linux operating system.
  • An internet connection
  • A Shiba Inu puppy (just kidding!)
You’ll also need somewhere to keep the Dogecoin you mine. Go to Dogecoin’s homepage and download a wallet.
Note: A wallet is like an email account. It has a public address for sending/receiving Dogecoin and a private key to access them. Your private keys are like your email’s password. Private keys are very important and need to be kept completely secure.
There are two different types; a light wallet and a full wallet. To mine Dogecoin, you’ll need the full wallet. It’s called Dogecoin Core.
Now that you’ve got a wallet, you need some software and hardware.
Dogecoin Mining Hardware
You can mine Dogecoin with;
  • Your PC’s CPU: The CPU in your PC is probably powerful enough to mine Dogecoin. However, it is not recommended. Mining can cause less powerful computers to overheat which causes damage.
  • A GPU: GPUs (or graphics cards) are used to improve computer graphics but they can also be used to mine Dogecoin. There are plenty of GPUs to choose from but here are a few to get you started;SAPPHIRE Pulse Radeon RX 580 ($426.98)Nvidia GeForce GTX ($579.99)ASUS RX Vega 64 ($944.90)
  • A Scrypt ASIC Miner: This is a piece of hardware designed to do one job only. Scrypt ASIC miners are programmed to mine scrypt based currencies like Litecoin and Dogecoin. ASIC miners are very powerful. They are also very expensive, very loud and can get very hot! Here’s a few for you to check out;Innosilicon A2 Terminator ($760)Bitmain Antminer L3 ($1,649)BW L21 Scrypt Miner ($7,700)
Dogecoin Mining Software
Whether you’re mining with an ASIC, a GPU or a CPU, you’ll need some software to go with it. You should try to use the software that works best with the hardware you’re using. Here’s a short list of the best free software for each choice of mining hardware;
  • CPU: If you just want to give mining a quick try, using your computer’s CPU will work fine. The only software I would recommend for mining using a CPU only is CPU miner which you can download for free here.
  • GPU: If you mine with a GPU there are more software options. Here are a few to check out;CudaMiner– Works best with Nvidia products.CGminer– Works with most GPU hardware.EasyMiner– User-friendly, so it’s good for beginners.
  • Scrypt ASIC miner:MultiMiner– Great for mining scrypt based currencies like Litecoin and Dogecoin. It can also be used to mine SHA-256 currencies like Bitcoin.CGminer and EasyMiner can also be used with ASIC miners.
Recommendations
You’re a beginner, so keep it simple! When you first start mining Dogecoin I would recommend using a GPU like the Radeon RX 580 with EasyMiner software. Then I would recommend joining a Dogecoin mining pool. The best pools to join are multi-currency pools like Multipool or AikaPool.
If you want to mine Dogecoin but don’t want to invest in all the tech, there is one other option…
Dogecoin Cloud Mining
Cloud mining is mining without mining! Put simply, you rent computer power from a huge data center for a monthly or yearly fee. The Dogecoin is mined at the center and then your share is sent to you.
All you need to cloud mine Dogecoin is a Dogecoin wallet. Then choose a cloud mining pool to join. Eobot, Nice Hash and Genesis Mining all offer Scrypt-based cloud mining for a monthly fee.
There are pros and cons to Dogecoin cloud mining;
The Pros
  • It’s cheaper than setting up your own mining operation. There’s also no hot, noisy hardware lying around the house!
  • As a beginner, there isn’t a lot of technical stuff to think about.
  • You get a steady supply of new currency every month.
The Cons
  • Cloud mining pools don’t share much information about themselves and how they work. It can be hard to work out if a cloud mining contract is a good value for money.
  • You are only renting computer power. If the price of Dogecoin goes down, you will still have to pay the same amount for something that is worthless.
  • Dogecoin pools have fixed contracts. The world of crypto can change very quickly. You could be stuck with an unprofitable contract for two years!
  • It’s no fun letting someone else do the mining for you!
Now you know about all the different ways to mine Dogecoin we can ask the big question, can you make tons of money mining Dogecoin?
So, Is Dogecoin Mining Profitable?
The short answer is, not really. Dogecoin mining is not going to make you a crypto billionaire overnight. One Dogecoin is worth 0.002777 US Dollars. If you choose to mine Dogecoin solo, it will be difficult to make a profit. You will probably spend more money on electricity and hardware than you will make from Dogecoin mining. Even if you choose a Dogecoin pool or a cloud pool your profits will be small.
However, if you think I am telling you to not mine Dogecoin, then you’re WRONG! Of course, I think you should mine Dogecoin!
But why? Seriously…
Well, you should mine Dogecoin because it’s fun and you want to be a part of the Dogecoin family. Cryptocurrency is going to change the world and you want to be part of that change, right? Mining Dogecoin is a great way to get involved.
Dogecoin is the coin that puts a smile on people’s faces. By mining Dogecoin you’ll be supporting all the good work its community does. You’ll learn about mining from the friendliest gang in crypto. And who knows? In a few years, the Dogecoin you mine now could be worth thousands or even millions! In 2010, Bitcoin was worthless. Think about that!
Only you can choose whether to mine Dogecoin or not. You now know everything you need to know to make your choice. The future is here. So, what are you going to do?
submitted by alifkhalil469 to BtcNewz [link] [comments]

Console gaming is hardly different from PC gaming, and much of what people say about PC gaming to put it above console gaming is often wrong.

I’m not sure about you, but for the past few years, I’ve been hearing people go on and on about PCs "superiority" to the console market. People cite various reasons why they believe gaming on a PC is “objectively” better than console gaming, often for reasons related to power, costs, ease-of-use, and freedom.
…Only problem: much of what they say is wrong.
There are many misconceptions being thrown about PC gaming vs Console gaming, that I believe need to be addressed. This isn’t about “PC gamers being wrong,” or “consoles being the best,” absolutely not. I just want to cut through some of the stuff people use to put down console gaming, and show that console gaming is incredibly similar to PC gaming. I mean, yes, this is someone who mainly games on console, but I also am getting a new PC that I will game on as well, not to mention the 30 PC games I already own and play. I’m not particularly partial to one over the other.
Now I will mainly be focusing on the PlayStation side of the consoles, because I know it best, but much of what I say will apply to Xbox as well. Just because I don’t point out many specific Xbox examples, doesn’t mean that they aren’t out there.

“PCs can use TVs and monitors.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is the implication of one, and overall just… confusing. This is in some articles and the pcmasterrace “why choose a PC” section, where they’re practically implying that consoles can’t do this. I mean, yes, as long as the ports of your PC match up with your screen(s) inputs, you could plug a PC into either… but you could do the same with a console, again, as long as the ports match up.
I’m guessing the idea here is that gaming monitors often use Displayport, as do most dedicated GPUs, and consoles are generally restricted to HDMI… But even so, monitors often have HDMI ports. In fact, PC Magazine has just released their list of the best gaming monitors of 2017, and every single one of them has an HDMI port. A PS4 can be plugged into these just as easily as a GTX 1080.
I mean, even if the monitoTV doesn’t have HDMI or AV to connect with your console, just use an adaptor. If you have a PC with ports that doesn’t match your monitoTV… use an adapter. I don’t know what the point of this argument is, but it’s made a worrying amount of times.

“On PC, you have a wide range of controller options, but on console you’re stuck with the standard controller."

Are you on PlayStation and wish you could use a specific type of controller that suits your favorite kind of gameplay? Despite what some may believe, you have just as many options as PC.
Want to play fighting games with a classic arcade-style board, featuring the buttons and joystick? Here you go!
Want to get serious about racing and get something more accurate and immersive than a controller? Got you covered.
Absolutely crazy about flying games and, like the racers, want something better than a controller? Enjoy!
Want Wii-style motion controls? Been around since the PS3. If you prefer the form factor of the Xbox One controller but you own a PS4, Hori’s got you covered. And of course, if keyboard and mouse it what keeps you on PC, there’s a PlayStation compatible solution for that. Want to use the keyboard and mouse that you already own? Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
Of course, these aren’t isolated examples, there are plenty of options for each of these kind of controllers. You don’t have to be on PC to enjoy alternate controllers.

“On PC you could use Steam Link to play anywhere in your house and share games with others.”

PS4 Remote play app on PC/Mac, PSTV, and PS Vita.
PS Family Sharing.
Using the same PSN account on multiple PS4s/Xbox Ones and PS3s/360s, or using multiple accounts on the same console.
In fact, if multiple users are on the same PS4, only one has to buy the game for both users to play it on that one PS4. On top of that, only one of them has to have PS Plus for both to play online (if the one with PS Plus registers the PS4 as their main system).
PS4 Share Play; if two people on separate PS4s want to play a game together that only one of them owns, they can join a Party and the owner of the game can have their friend play with them in the game.
Need I say more?

“Gaming is more expensive on console.”

Part one, the Software
This is one that I find… genuinely surprising. There’s been a few times I’ve mentioned that part of the reason I chose a PS4 is for budget gaming, only to told that “games are cheaper on Steam.” To be fair, there are a few games on PSN/XBL that are more expensive than they are on Steam, so I can see how someone could believe this… but apparently they forgot about disks.
Dirt Rally, a hardcore racing sim game that’s… still $60 on all 3 platforms digitally… even though its successor is out.
So does this mean you have to pay full retail for this racing experience? Nope, because disk prices.
Just Cause 3, an insane open-world experience that could essentially be summed up as “break stuff, screw physics.” And it’s a good example of where the Steam price is lower than PSN and XBL:
Not by much, but still cheaper on Steam, so cheaper on PC… Until you look at the disk prices.
See my point? Often times the game is cheaper on console because of the disk alternative that’s available for practically every console-available game. Even when the game is brand new.
Dirt 4 - Remember that Dirt Rally successor I mentioned?
Yes, you could either buy this relatively new game digitally for $60, or just pick up the disk for a discounted price. And again, this is for a game that came out 2 months ago, and even it’s predecessor’s digital cost is locked at $60. Of course, I’m not going to ignore the fact that Dirt 4 is currently (as of writing this) discounted on Steam, but on PSN it also happens to be discounted for about the same amount.
Part 2: the Subscription
Now… let’s not ignore the elephant in the room: PS Plus and Xbox Gold. Now these would be ignorable, if they weren’t required for online play (on the PlayStation side, it’s only required for PS4, but still). So yes, it’s still something that will be included in the cost of your PS4 or Xbox One/360, assuming you play online. Bummer, right?
Here’s the thing, although that’s the case, although you have to factor in this $60 cost with your console, you can make it balance out, at worst, and make it work out for you as a budget gamer, at best. As nice as it would be to not have to deal with the price if you don’t want to, it’s not like it’s a problem if you use it correctly.
Imagine going to a new restaurant. This restaurant has some meals that you can’t get anywhere else, and fair prices compared to competitors. Only problem: you have to pay a membership fee to have the sides. Now you can have the main course, sit down and enjoy your steak or pasta, but if you want to have a side to have a full meal, you have to pay an annual fee.
Sounds shitty, right? But here’s the thing: not only does this membership allow you to have sides with your meal, but it also allows you to eat two meals for free every month, and also gives you exclusive discounts for other meals, drinks, and desserts.
Let’s look at PS Plus for a minute: for $60 per year, you get:
  • 2 free PS4 games, every month
  • 2 free PS3 games, every month
  • 1 PS4/PS3 and Vita compatible game, and 1 Vita-only game, every month
  • Exclusive/Extended discounts, especially during the weekly/seasonal sales (though you don’t need PS Plus to get sales, PS Plus members get to enjoy the best sales)
  • access to online multiplayer
So yes, you’re paying extra because of that membership, but what you get with that deal pays for it and then some. In fact, let’s ignore the discounts for a minute: you get 24 free PS4 games, 24 free PS3 games, and 12 Vita only + 12 Vita compatible games, up to 72 free games every year. Even if you only one of these consoles, that’s still 24 free games a year. Sure, maybe you get games for the month that you don’t like, then just wait until next month.
In fact, let’s look at Just Cause 3 again. It was free for PS Plus members in August, which is a pretty big deal. Why is this significant? Because it’s, again, a $60 digital game. That means with this one download, you’ve balanced out your $60 annual fee. Meaning? Every free game after that is money saved, every discount after that is money saved. And this is a trend: every year, PS Plus will release a game that balances out the entire service cost, then another 23 more that will only add icing to that budget cake. Though, you could just count games as paying off PS Plus until you hit $60 in savings, but still.
All in all, PS Plus, and Xbox Gold which offers similar options, saves you money. On top of that, again, you don't need to have these to get discounts, but with these memberships, you get more discounts.
Now, I’ve seen a few Steam games go up for free for a week, but what about being free for an entire month? Not to mention that; even if you want to talk about Steam Summer Sales, what about the PSN summer sale, or again, disc sale discounts? Now a lot of research and math would be needed to see if every console gamer would save money compared to every Steam gamer for the same games, but at the very least? The costs will balance out, at worst.
Part 3, the Systems
  • Xbox and PS2: $299
  • Xbox 360 and PS3: $299 and $499, respectively
  • Xbox One and PS4: $499 and $399, respectively.
Rounded up a few dollars, that’s $1,000 - $1,300 in day-one consoles, just to keep up with the games! Crazy right? So called budget systems, such a rip-off.
Well, keep in mind that the generations here aren’t short.
The 6th generation, from the launch of the PS2 to the launch of the next generation consoles, lasted 5 years, 6 years based on the launch of the PS3 (though you could say it was 9 or 14, since the Xbox wasn’t discontinued until 2009, and the PS2 was supported all the way to 2014, a year after the PS4 was released). The 7th gen lasted 7 - 8 years, again depending on whether you count the launch of the Xbox 360 to PS3. The 8th gen so far has lasted 4 years. That’s 17 years that the console money is spread over. If you had a Netflix subscription for it’s original $8 monthly plan for that amount of time, that would be over $1,600 total.
And let’s be fair here, just like you could upgrade your PC hardware whenever you wanted, you didn’t have to get a console from launch. Let’s look at PlayStation again for example: In 2002, only two years after its release, the PS2 retail price was cut from $300 to $200. The PS3 Slim, released 3 years after the original, was $300, $100-$200 lower than the retail cost. The PS4? You could’ve either gotten the Uncharted bundle for $350, or one of the PS4 Slim bundles for $250. This all brings it down to $750 - $850, which again, is spread over a decade and a half. This isn’t even counting used consoles, sales, or the further price cuts that I didn’t mention.
Even if that still sounds like a lot of money to you, even if you’re laughing at the thought of buying new systems every several years, because your PC “is never obsolete,” tell me: how many parts have you changed out in your PC over the years? How many GPUs have you been through? CPUs? Motherboards? RAM sticks, monitors, keyboards, mice, CPU coolers, hard drives— that adds up. You don’t need to replace your entire system to spend a lot of money on hardware.
Even if you weren’t upgrading for the sake of upgrading, I’d be amazed if the hardware you’ve been pushing by gaming would last for about 1/3 of that 17 year period. Computer parts aren’t designed to last forever, and really won’t when you’re pushing them with intensive gaming for hours upon hours. Generally speaking, your components might last you 6-8 years, if you’ve got the high-end stuff. But let’s assume you bought a system 17 years ago that was a beast for it’s time, something so powerful, that even if it’s parts have degraded over time, it’s still going strong. Problem is: you will have to upgrade something eventually.
Even if you’ve managed to get this far into the gaming realm with the same 17 year old hardware, I’m betting you didn’t do it with a 17 year Operating System. How much did Windows 7 cost you? Or 8.1? Or 10? Oh, and don’t think you can skirt the cost by getting a pre-built system, the cost of Windows is embedded into the cost of the machine (why else would Microsoft allow their OS to go on so many machines).
Sure, Windows 10 was a free upgrade for a year, but that’s only half of it’s lifetime— You can’t get it for free now, and not for the past year. On top of that, the free period was an upgrade; you had to pay for 7 or 8 first anyway.
Point is, as much as one would like to say that they didn’t need to buy a new system every so often for the sake of gaming, that doesn’t mean they haven’t been paying for hardware, and even if they’ve only been PC gaming recently, you’ll be spending money on hardware soon enough.

“PC is leading the VR—“

Let me stop you right there.
If you add together the total number of Oculus Rifts and HTC Vives sold to this day, and threw in another 100,000 just for the sake of it, that number would still be under the number of PSVR headsets sold.
Why could this possibly be? Well, for a simple reason: affordability. The systems needed to run the PC headsets costs $800+, and the headsets are $500 - $600, when discounted. PSVR on the other hand costs $450 for the full bundle (headset, camera, and move controllers, with a demo disc thrown in), and can be played on either a $250 - $300 console, or a $400 console, the latter recommended. Even if you want to say that the Vive and Rift are more refined, a full PSVR set, system and all, could cost just over $100 more than a Vive headset alone.
If anything, PC isn’t leading the VR gaming market, the PS4 is. It’s the system bringing VR to the most consumers, showing them what the future of gaming could look like. Not to mention that as the PlayStation line grows more powerful (4.2 TFLOP PS4 Pro, 10 TFLOP “PS5…”), it won’t be long until the PlayStation line can use the same VR games as PC.
Either way, this shows that there is a console equivalent to the PC VR options. Sure, there are some games you'd only be able to play on PC, but there are also some games you'd only be able to play on PSVR.
…Though to be fair, if we’re talking about VR in general, these headsets don’t even hold a candle to, surprisingly, Gear VR.

“If it wasn’t for consoles holding devs back, then they would be able to make higher quality games.”

This one is based on the idea that because of how “low spec” consoles are, that when a developer has to take them in mind, then they can’t design the game to be nearly as good as it would be otherwise. I mean, have you ever seen the minimum specs for games on Steam?
GTA V
  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs) / AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs) @ 2.5GHz
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA 9800 GT 1GB / AMD HD 4870 1GB (DX 10, 10.1, 11)
Just Cause 3
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2500k, 3.3GHz / AMD Phenom II X6 1075T 3GHz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 (2GB) / AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB)
Fallout 4
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2300 2.8 GHz/AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0 GHz or equivalent
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 550 Ti 2GB/AMD Radeon HD 7870 2GB or equivalent
Overwatch
  • CPU: Intel Core i3 or AMD Phenom™ X3 8650
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 460, ATI Radeon™ HD 4850, or Intel® HD Graphics 4400
Witcher 3
  • Processor: Intel CPU Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz / AMD CPU Phenom II X4 940
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GPU GeForce GTX 660 / AMD GPU Radeon HD 7870
Actually, bump up all the memory requirements to 8 GBs, and those are some decent specs, relatively speaking. And keep in mind these are the minimum specs to even open the games. It’s almost as if the devs didn’t worry about console specs when making a PC version of the game, because this version of the game isn’t on console. Or maybe even that the consoles aren’t holding the games back that much because they’re not that weak. Just a hypothesis.
But I mean, the devs are still ooobviously having to take weak consoles into mind right? They could make their games sooo much more powerful if they were PC only, right? Right?
No. Not even close.
iRacing
  • CPU: Intel Core i3, i5, i7 or better or AMD Bulldozer or better
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVidia GeForce 2xx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory / AMD 5xxx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory
Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds
  • CPU: Intel Core i3-4340 / AMD FX-6300
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • GPU: nVidia GeForce GTX 660 2GB / AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB
These are PC only games. That’s right, no consoles to hold them back, they don’t have to worry about whether an Xbox One could handle it. Yet, they don’t require anything more than the Multiplatform games.
Subnautica
  • CPU: Intel Haswell 2 cores / 4 threads @ 2.5Ghz or equivalent
  • Memory: 4GB
  • GPU: Intel HD 4600 or equivalent - This includes most GPUs scoring greater than 950pts in the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark
Rust
  • CPU: 2 ghz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 11 (they don’t even list a GPU)
So what’s the deal? Theoretically, if developers don’t have to worry about console specs, then why aren’t they going all-out and making games that no console could even dream of supporting?
Low-end PCs.
What, did you think people only game on Steam if they spent at least $500 on gaming hardware? Not all PC gamers have gaming-PC specs, and if devs close their games out to players who don’t have the strongest of PCs, then they’d be losing out on a pretty sizable chunk of their potential buyers.
Saying “devs having to deal with consoles is holding gaming back” is like saying “racing teams having to deal with Ford is holding GT racing back.” A: racing teams don’t have to deal with Ford if they don’t want to, which is probably why many of them don’t, and B: even though Ford doesn’t make the fastest cars overall, they still manage to make cars that are awesome on their own, they don’t even need to be compared to anything else to know that they make good cars.
I want to go back to that previous point though, developers having to deal with low-end PCs, because it’s integral to the next point:

“PCs are more powerful, gaming on PC provides a better experience.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is… misleading.
Did you know that according to the Steam Hardware & Software Survey (July 2017) , the percentage of Steam gamers who use a GPU that's less powerful than that of a PS4 Slim’s GPU is well over 50%? Things get dismal when compared to the PS4 Pro (Or Xbox One X). On top of that, the percentage of PC gamers who own a Nvidia 10 series card is about 20% (about 15% for the 1060, 1080 and 1070 owners).
Now to be fair, the large majority of gamers have CPUs with considerably high clock speeds, which is the main factor in CPU gaming performance. But, the number of Steam gamers with as much RAM or more than a PS4 or Xbox One is less than 50%, which can really bottleneck what those CPUs can handle.
These numbers are hardly better than they were in 2013, all things considered. Sure, a PS3/360 weeps in the face of even a $400 PC, but in this day in age, consoles have definitely caught up.
Sure, we could mention the fact that even 1% of Steam accounts represents over 1 million accounts, but that doesn’t really matter compared to the 10s of millions of 8th gen consoles sold; looking at it that way, sure the number of Nvidia 10 series owners is over 20 million, but that ignores the fact that there are over 5 times more 8th gen consoles sold than that.
Basically, even though PCs run on a spectrum, saying they're more powerful “on average” is actually wrong. Sure, they have the potential for being more powerful, but most of the time, people aren’t willing to pay the premium to reach those extra bits of performance.
Now why is this important? What matters are the people who spent the premium cost for premium parts, right? Because of the previous point: PCs don’t have some ubiquitous quality over the consoles, developers will always have to keep low-end PCs in mind, because not even half of all PC players can afford the good stuff, and you have to look at the top quarter of Steam players before you get to PS4-Pro-level specs. If every Steam player were to get a PS4 Pro, it would be an upgrade for over 60% of them, and 70% of them would be getting an upgrade with the Xbox One X.
Sure, you could still make the argument that when you pay more for PC parts, you get a better experience than you could with a console. We can argue all day about budget PCs, but a console can’t match up to a $1,000 PC build. It’s the same as paying more for car parts, in the end you get a better car. However, there is a certain problem with that…

“You pay a little more for a PC, you get much more quality.”

The idea here is that the more you pay for PC parts, the performance increases at a faster rate than the price does. Problem: that’s not how technology works. Paying twice as much doesn’t get you twice the quality the majority of the time.
For example, let’s look at graphics cards, specifically the GeForce 10 series cards, starting with the GTX 1050.
  • 1.8 TFLOP
  • 1.35 GHz base clock
  • 2 GB VRAM
  • $110
This is our reference, our basis of comparison. Any percentages will be based on the 1050’s specs.
Now let’s look at the GTX 1050 Ti, the 1050’s older brother.
  • 2.1 TFLOP
  • 1.29 GHz base clock
  • 4 GB VRAM
  • $140 retail
This is pretty good. You only increase the price by about 27%, and you get an 11% increase in floating point speed and a 100% increase (double) in VRAM. Sure you get a slightly lower base clock, but the rest definitely makes up for it. In fact, according to GPU boss, the Ti managed 66 fps, or a 22% increase in frame rate for Battlefield 4, and a 54% increase in mHash/second in bitcoin mining. The cost increase is worth it, for the most part.
But let’s get to the real meat of it; what happens when we double our budget? Surely we should see a massive increase performance, I bet some of you are willing to bet that twice the cost means more than twice the performance.
The closest price comparison for double the cost is the GTX 1060 (3 GB), so let’s get a look at that.
  • 3.0 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 3 GB VRAM
  • $200 retail
Well… not substantial, I’d say. About a 50% increase in floating point speed, an 11% increase in base clock speed, and a 1GB decrease in VRAM. For [almost] doubling the price, you don’t get much.
Well surely raw specs don’t tell the full story, right? Well, let’s look at some real wold comparisons. Once again, according to GPU Boss, there’s a 138% increase in hashes/second for bitcoin mining, and at 99 fps, an 83% frame rate increase in Battlefield 4. Well, then, raw specs does not tell the whole story!
Here’s another one, the 1060’s big brother… or, well, slightly-more-developed twin.
  • 3.9 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 6 GB VRAM
  • $250 retail
Seems reasonable, another $50 for a decent jump in power and double the memory! But, as we’ve learned, we shouldn’t look at the specs for the full story.
I did do a GPU Boss comparison, but for the BF4 frame rate, I had to look at Tom’s Hardware (sorry miners, GPU boss didn’t cover the mHash/sec spec either). What’s the verdict? Well, pretty good, I’d say. With 97 FPS, a 79% increase over the 1050— wait. 97? That seems too low… I mean, the 3GB version got 99.
Well, let’s see what Tech Power Up has to say...
94.3 fps. 74% increase. Huh.
Alright alright, maybe that was just a dud. We can gloss over that I guess. Ok, one more, but let’s go for the big fish: the GTX 1080.
  • 9.0 TFLOP
  • 1.6 GHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $500 retail
That jump in floating point speed definitely has to be something, and 4 times the VRAM? Sure it’s 5 times the price, but as we saw, raw power doesn’t always tell the full story. GPU Boss returns to give us the run down, how do these cards compare in the real world?
Well… a 222% (over three-fold) increase in mHash speed, and a 218% increase in FPS for Battlefield 4. That’s right, for 5 times the cost, you get 3 times the performance. Truly, the raw specs don’t tell the full story.
You increase the cost by 27%, you increase frame rate in our example game by 22%. You increase the cost by 83%, you increase the frame rate by 83%. Sounds good, but if you increase the cost by 129%, and you get a 79% (-50% cost/power increase) increase in frame rate. You increase it by 358%, and you increase the frame rate by 218% (-140% cost/power increase). That’s not paying “more for much more power,” that’s a steep drop-off after the third cheapest option.
In fact, did you know that you have to get to the 1060 (6GB) before you could compare the GTX line to a PS4 Pro? Not to mention that at $250, the price of a 1060 (6GB) you could get an entire PS4 Slim bundle, or that you have to get to the 1070 before you beat the Xbox One X.
On another note, let’s look at a PS4 Slim…
  • 1.84 TFLOP
  • 800 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $300 retail
…Versus a PS4 Pro.
  • 4.2 TFLOP
  • 911 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $400 retail
128% increase in floating point speed, 13% increase in clock speed, for a 25% difference in cost. Unfortunately there is no Battlefield 4 comparison to make, but in BF1, the frame rate is doubled (30 fps to 60) and the textures are taken to 11. For what that looks like, I’ll leave it up to this bloke. Not to even mention that you can even get the texture buffs in 4K. Just like how you get a decent increase in performance based on price for the lower-cost GPUs, the same applies here.
It’s even worse when you look at the CPU for a gaming PC. The more money you spend, again, the less of a benefit you get per dollar. Hardware Unboxed covers this in a video comparing different levels of Intel CPUs. One thing to note is that the highest i7 option (6700K) in this video was almost always within 10 FPS (though for a few games, 15 FPS) of a certain CPU in that list for just about all of the games.
…That CPU was the lowest i3 (6100) option. The lowest i3 was $117 and the highest i7 was $339, a 189% price difference for what was, on average, a 30% or less difference in frame rate. Even the lowest Pentium option (G4400, $63) was often able to keep up with the i7.
The CPU and GPU are usually the most expensive and power-consuming parts of a build, which is why I focused on them (other than the fact that they’re the two most important parts of a gaming PC, outside of RAM). With both, this “pay more to get much more performance” idea is pretty much the inverse of the truth.

“The console giants are bad for game developers, Steam doesn't treat developers as bad as Microsoft or especially Sony.”

Now one thing you might’ve heard is that the PS3 was incredibly difficult for developers to make games for, which for some, fueled the idea that console hardware is difficult too develop on compared to PC… but this ignores a very basic idea that we’ve already touched on: if the devs don’t want to make the game compatible with a system, they don’t have to. In fact, this is why Left 4 Dead and other Valve games aren’t on PS3, because they didn’t want to work with it’s hardware, calling it “too complex.” This didn’t stop the game from selling well over 10 million units worldwide. If anything, this was a problem for the PS3, not the dev team.
This also ignores that games like LittleBigPlanet, Grand Theft Auto IV, and Metal Gear Solid 4 all came out in the same year as Left 4 Dead (2008) on PS3. Apparently, plenty of other dev teams didn’t have much of a problem with the PS3’s hardware, or at the very least, they got used to it soon enough.
On top of that, when developing the 8th gen consoles, both Sony and Microsoft sought to use CPUs that were easier for developers, which included making decisions that considered apps for the consoles’ usage for more than gaming. On top of that, using their single-chip proprietary CPUs is cheaper and more energy efficient than buying pre-made CPUs and boards, which is far better of a reason for using them than some conspiracy about Sony and MS trying to make devs' lives harder.
Now, console exclusives are apparently a point of contention: it’s often said that exclusive can cause developers to go bankrupt. However, exclusivity doesn’t have to be a bad thing for the developer. For example, when Media Molecule had to pitch their game to a publisher (Sony, coincidentally), they didn’t end up being tied into something detrimental to them.
Their initial funding lasted for 6 months. From then, Sony offered additional funding, in exchange for Console Exclusivity. This may sound concerning to some, but the game ended up going on to sell almost 6 million units worldwide and launched Media Molecule into the gaming limelight. Sony later bought the development studio, but 1: this was in 2010, two years after LittleBigPlanet’s release, and 2: Media Molecule seem pretty happy about it to this day. If anything, signing up with Sony was one of the best things they could’ve done, in their opinion.
Does this sound like a company that has it out for developers? There are plenty of examples that people will use to put Valve in a good light, but even Sony is comparatively good to developers.

“There are more PC gamers.”

The total number of active PC gamers on Steam has surpassed 120 million, which is impressive, especially considering that this number is double that of 2013’s figure (65 million). But the number of monthly active users on Xbox Live and PSN? About 120 million (1, 2) total. EDIT: You could argue that this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, sure, so if you want to, say, compare the monthly number of Steam users to console? Steam has about half of what consoles do, at 67 million.
Now, back to the 65 million total user figure for Steam, the best I could find for reference for PlayStation's number was an article giving the number of registered PSN accounts in 2013, 150 million. In a similar 4-year period (2009 - 2013), the number of registered PSN accounts didn’t double, it sextupled, or increased by 6 fold. Considering how the PS4 is already at 2/3 of the number of sales the PS3 had, even though it’s currently 3 years younger than its predecessor, I’m sure this trend is at least generally consistent.
For example, let’s look at DOOM 2016, an awesome faced-paced shooting title with graphics galore… Of course, on a single platform, it sold best on PC/Steam. 2.36 million Steam sales, 2.05 million PS4 sales, 1.01 million Xbox One sales.
But keep in mind… when you add the consoles sales together, you get over 3 million sales on the 8th gen systems. Meaning: this game was best sold on console. In fact, the Steam sales have only recently surpassed the PS4 sales. By the way VG charts only shows sales for physical copies of the games, so the number of PS4 and Xbox sales, when digital sales are included, are even higher than 3 million.
This isn’t uncommon, by the way.
Even with the games were the PC sales are higher than either of the consoles, there generally are more console sales total. But, to be fair, this isn’t anything new. The number of PC gamers hasn’t dominated the market, the percentages have always been about this much. PC can end up being the largest single platform for games, but consoles usually sell more copies total.
EDIT: There were other examples but... Reddit has a 40,000-character limit.

"Modding is only on PC."

Xbox One is already working on it, and Bethesda is helping with that.
PS4 isn't far behind either. You could argue that these are what would be the beta stages of modding, but that just means modding on consoles will only grow.

What’s the Point?

This isn’t to say that there’s anything wrong with PC gaming, and this isn’t to exalt consoles. I’m not here to be the hipster defending the little guy, nor to be the one to try to put down someone/thing out of spite. This is about showing that PCs and consoles are overall pretty similar because there isn’t much dividing them, and that there isn’t anything wrong with being a console gamer. There isn’t some chasm separating consoles and PCs, at the end of the day they’re both computers that are (generally) designed for gaming. This about unity as gamers, to try to show that there shouldn’t be a massive divide just because of the computer system you game on. I want gamers to be in an environment where specs don't separate us; whether you got a $250 PS4 Slim or just built a $2,500 gaming PC, we’re here to game and should be able to have healthy interactions regardless of your platform.
I’m well aware that this isn’t going to fix… much, but this needs to be said: there isn’t a huge divide between the PC and consoles, they’re far more similar than people think. There are upsides and downsides that one has that the other doesn’t on both sides. There’s so much more I could touch on, like how you could use SSDs or 3.5 inch hard drives with both, or that even though PC part prices go down over time, so do consoles, but I just wanted to touch on the main points people try to use to needlessly separate the two kinds of systems (looking at you PCMR) and correct them, to get the point across.
I thank anyone who takes the time to read all of this, and especially anyone who doesn’t take what I say out of context. I also want to note that, again, this isn’tanti-PC gamer.” If it were up to me, everyone would be a hybrid gamer.
Cheers.
submitted by WhyyyCantWeBeFriends to unpopularopinion [link] [comments]

[Discussion] My own personal guide to used hardware alternatives.

Hi there. My name is Jeff. I've been building systems for the better part of 15 years and try my best to contribute here actively. After being involved in this little community for a few years now, I'm noticing a serious lack of discussion about buying used components, and I feel like it's time to shed a little light on the subject for those looking to build on a (seriously) tight budget.
As Linus said in his scrapyard wars video, buying new on $300 isn't practical, and if you posed the challenge to him on a random day, buying used is almost certainly the path he'd choose. As someone who's been "scrapyarding" as a hobby for the better part of 10 years, I figured I'd take some time to share some of what I've learned for the modern audience.
Let's begin with a simple rundown of modern "budget" choices, and I'll tell you what I'd do instead.
CPU
The G3258 and Athlon 860k are the sub-$100 CPUs of choice, and both work just fine. I have built with both in the past, and each carries their own set of advantages.
Used Alternatives: You can go in a couple of directions here; if you happen to have an LGA 1366 motherboard lying around, you can get an i7 920 or better for under $50, and they still hold up reasonably well. Being that LGA 1366 boards are not typically cheap when purchased used, my favourite option is the Phenom II x4 Black Edition series, each of which compare favourably to modern budget options, and will even overclock on some incredibly dated, dirt cheap AM2+ boards. In my experience, eBay prices on these get a little too high for my taste, but I've been able to nab several on Kijiji locally in Toronto for under $50 as well.
GPU
The R7 260x and GTX 750 ti are often cited as budget options for most builders, with the latter serving a very specific role in systems where power draw might be a concern. While there exists no option that can complete with the low consumption of the 750 ti (or even the single 6-pin connector goodness of the 260x), its performance can easily be matched (and exceeded) for less money.
Used Alternatives: The bitcoin mining craze from a few years back led to the Radeon 7950 and 7970 being blacklisted on the used market, and I think the fears about burned-out cards are a little overblown. Here in Toronto, you can easily grab a 7950 for the price of a 260x, but I don't pay anywhere near that for my builds. At most, a Windforce will cost me $125, as where I recently picked up some non-boost edition PowerColor versions for a mere $83 each (bought 3 for $250).
EDIT: Forgot to mention something important - avoid the reference 7950 and 7970. They were employed to a far greater degree in mining rigs because of their rear-only exhaust, and if you see a bunch of them from the same seller listed at once, they're likely old mining cards. Only pick them up if they're incredibly cheap.
Want to go even cheaper? The Radeon 6950 (with the shader unlock, preferably) or even the 6970 will rival the performance of the 260x, and shouldn't cost Canadians more than $50-$60. I personally have 2 in my possession right now, and have gone through at least a dozen in the last 6 months.
In general, one should always avoid Nvidia when buying used, because they are far too popular and overvalued for their performance as they age. I still see GTX 660s selling for $150, which is absolutely absurd.
Motherboards
Motherboards on the used market are weird, and this can largely be attributed to the fact that they're hard to transport and don't handle well over time. As such, people don't really sell boards on their own that often, and you'll likely have more luck finding a combo of some kind (or even a ready-to-go tin-can with no graphics card) for less per part than you will finding a given board on its own.
Used Alternatives: The boards I'd recommend depend entirely on the CPU you've chosen. Being that I'm a fan of the Phenom II x4 series, AM2+ boards are going to be dirt cheap, but DDR2 RAM is actually fucking expensive, so you'd likely be better off going with AM3. I've even seen some used AM3+ boards (The 970 ASRock Extreme3, in particular) for as low as $40, so it wouldn't hurt to look.
On the Intel side, you're actually at a significant disadvantage. Much like Nvidia cards, Intel boards (and CPUs) actually retain their value and don't often come cheap. For me, LGA 1156 is the price/performance sweet spot, granted I can find an i7 8XX to go with it. Even still, they're going to run you a fair bit more than an AMD board, and likely aren't worth it by comparison.
RAM
Ram is ram. DDR2 is pricy as fuck due to an obvious market shortage of the stuff, so the AM2+ board option might not be best by comparison. DDR3 ram, however, is ubiquitous, and I always die a little inside when people building on a "budget" choose to buy new at all. If I'm being honest, I can get DDR3 ram from e-waste recycling companies for as low as $10 per 4GB stick, at 1333MHz, and not once have I ever had a bad stick of the stuff. Even for people going the route of the G3258 (which only supports 1333MHz), this is the clear winner.
Is value RAM ugly as sin? Sure it is. It is just as good as that fancy Ripjaws shit you've got in your current build? You betcha.
Storage
Hard Drives are actually a tricky game, as they are the single most volatile component in any budget build, easily succumbing to wear and tear from age and daily use. As such (and some might find this hard to believe) I actively avoid HDDs when building value systems for people and opt for cheap SSDs instead. As always, check the date on a drive if you're really insistent on buying one, and considering how cheap a WD blue is new, don't pull the trigger on one unless it's for less than $30/TB.
SSDs are obviously (akin to RAM) highly resilient and are nearly guaranteed to work when purchased used. The average SSD pulled from an old laptop or an office off-lease desktop, will have no more than 100GB of writes on it, which leaves 99% of its life for you to exploit. While there exists no specific recommendation for which brand to buy, just be sure you're getting a relatively good drive with SATA III capability. 120/128GB variants of these sorts should cost you no more than $50 in my native Canada, and I've even gotten lucky on some larger sizes too. Recently I picked up 4 256GB Samsung 840 Pros for $75 each (I came), just days after I bought a Crucial MX100 of the same size for $85.
Monitors
Monitors are fun to buy, because the recent shifts in display technology have rendered a lot of recent-but-obsolete models nearly valueless. For example, remember when 16:10 was a thing? I actually still like 1680x1050 monitors, but the rest of the world seems to disagree, so I've been able to pick up 23" variants for as little as $40. Being that the slightly lower resolution actually eases the strain on your VRAM a bit, it's a nice fit for a lot of budget cards that might not have a full 2GB available, like some variants of the 6950. 1600x900 monitors are often just as cheap and come with the same inherent benefit of being obsolete despite being almost as good as its bigger 1080p cousin.
Keyboards and Mice
If you're on a budget, we can't even have this discussion. As much as I like mechanical keyboards and high-precision gaming mice, people building used $300 systems aren't going to allot any of their budget buying them. That said, wired USB keyboards and mice are virtually free (search your local goodwill or value village for some), and if you have to pay money, buy a wireless combo for $20 new from some little shit store in a suburb somewhere.
Cases
Cases on their own sell for about half of their original retail price, give or take based on the condition. I normally just get them as a part of a tin-can bundle and make use of them if they aren't too dirty, but when building for someone else, I'd often just prefer to buy a new budget case in the $40 range.
PSUs
I saved this topic for last, because it's by far the most difficult category to master. First off, you really need to do your research and understand how PSUs work before delving into these guys, as the cost associated is almost entirely dependent on how resilient the underlying platform has been proven to be. Generally speaking, reading reviews on JonnyGuru and HardOCP is a great start, but none of them account for units that are several years old.
As a general rule of thumb, I use the EVGA 500W W1 as a reference point, and build my value tree around that. In other words, if a new EVGA 500W (a passable, proven budget unit) is cheaper than a used 500W variant of a better brand, why would I bother buying used? Sure, that 520W Seasonic S12II puts the EVGA to shame in terms of voltage regulation and ripple suppression, but can I really make the same claims of a unit that's 5 years into its life? Wouldn't I just be safer buying new? These are all factors you have to consider.
For me, the threshold lies around 50% in terms of cost savings vs. risk. In other words, if you can find a used quality unit for less than half the price of the cheapest quality unit available at a given time, buy it.
Anyhow I think that covers everything. And as a closing note, remember to be safe. Meet potential sellers (and buyers) in public, well-lit places, and try your best to avoid entering someone's home without some protections in place. Also, the more info you get about the person (address, phone number, etc) the less likely it is that a person will be trying to scam you. People who purposely conceal their identity do so for a reason.
Also, feel free to ask me anything about my own experiences buying and selling used. I've been doing it as a hobby for a long, long time and have sold many value builds to people who can't otherwise afford PCs. I'm happy to impart any wisdom I might've gained over the years.
Edit: CPU Coolers! Forgot those. Air coolers are a safe bet. They're slabs of copper and aluminum with fans strapped to them. Buy with confidence, and seek one out for $10-$15 if you plan to overclock. AIO water cooling is not so safe. Those things are typically only good for 2-3 years, and you have no idea how much longer a pump has before it gives. Budget builders likely aren't water-cooling anyhow, right?
Edit 2: Just to be clear, when I said I'd been doing this for a long time, I should clarify that a) I once owned a game store and sold systems out of there and b) I currently resell systems out of my house to raise money for charity builds. I really don't want people to get the impression I'm trying to sell anything.
submitted by Oafah to buildapc [link] [comments]

Building Student Desktop - Value for Money - i5 6500 vs i5 4590 - UK/GB

Build Help:

Hi there. First post, and I hope I can receive some advice on a pc I am going to build.  
 
Quick Context: Engineering Student in Level 5 Of study, starting my 3rd Year in Study (Foundation -> 1st Year -> 2nd Year {Currently Here}), and I need to upgrade my existing computer, with a budget of less than £250.  
 
What is your intended use for this build? The more details the better.  
 
I Need a quicker computer (than currently on hand) for software simulation and Microsoft Office work for student tasks such as projects, assignments and research. Including MatLab, Eclipse, FEMM, AUTODESK, EDS and more.  
 
If gaming, what kind of performance are you looking for? (Screen resolution, framerate, game settings)  
 
Not of top priority, but I currently have a 7970, and a friend is offering a gtx 970 (2nd hand) for £125. I am fine with 1080p 60fps med settings on any game (I like games such as pillars of eternity, Divinity 2 original sin, LoL, but rarely play as much as i used to due to studying.)  
 
What is your budget (ballpark is okay)?  
 
£250, a little more if fine, but the less the better  
 
In what country are you purchasing your parts?  
 
UK/Great Britain  
 
Current Parts:  
 
CPU - AMD 860k @ 4.3GHz (Purchased 2nd hand)  
 
Fan - Artic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro (Purchased 2nd Hand, came only with am3 socket) MoBo - Gigabyte F2A68HM-HD2 (Purchased 2nd hand - exdisplay)  
 
RAM - 2 * 4GB Patriot PSD1600k PC3-12800 1600MHZ DDR3 (Purchased New)  
 
GPU - Sapphire 7970 3G D5 Boost (Purchased 2nd Hand)  
 
HDD - KingDian 128gb SSD (Purchased 2nd Hand) - WD 1TB Passport Ext. Drive(Gifted, New)(I Prefer my big data to be portable)  
 
PSU - EVGA 600W 80+ (Purchased New)  
 
Case - CiT Barricade mATX (Purchased New)  
 
Windows 10 (Purchased for me by University)  
 
Post a draft of your potential build here (specific parts please). [Consider formatting your parts list.]  
 
There are 2 Options:  
 
Socket 1150 CPU - intel i5 4590 - £90 - https://uk.webuy.com/product.php?sku=SCPUINTI54590A  
 
Fan - Cooler Master Hyper T2 - £12.83 - https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00K7809O2/?tag=pcp0f-21&th=1  
 
MoBo - Asrock H81M-DGS R2.0 (supports 4th gen intel) - £38.96 - https://www.ebuyer.com/662745-asrock-h81m-dgs-r2-0-socket-1150-vga-dvi-5-1-ch-hd-audio-micro-h81m-dgs-r2-0  
 
Ram - Can either Re-use my 8GB but I often find myself running out. Considering Going to Computer Exchange (CeX) and looking for:8gb ddr3 stick - £18 a stick- https://uk.webuy.com/product.php?sku=SMEM4QABB -  
Hopefully I can go in store and pick up a couple sticks that aren't ECC server sticks at my local store.  
 
Socket 1151 CPU - intel i5 6500 - £110 - https://uk.webuy.com/product.php?sku=SCPUINTI56500KA  
 
Fan - Cooler Master Hyper T2 - £12.83 - https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00K7809O2/?tag=pcp0f-21&th=1  
 
MoBo - MSI H110M ECO - £39.48 - https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B018XP38YI/?tag=pcp0f-21  
 
Ram - Need DDR4 for the new platform. Considering Going to Computer Exchange (CeX) and looking for:8gb ddr4 stick - £32 a stick- https://uk.webuy.com/product.php?sku=SMEM8G2133 - Hopefully I can go in store and pick up a couple sticks that aren't ECC server sticks at my local store.  
 
Provide any additional details you wish below.  
 
Re-using the mATX case, psu and my hdd.  
 
Things I like in a computer - Quiet, cool, powerful.  
 
I understand my current case is complete trash, so if someone who knows more could recommend a case (within the budget) a case that could contribute to keeping my pc cool, and quiet. I've noticed during the summer my pc will act as a radiator and my room temperature peaked at an astonishing (for me, here in the UK) 39 Degrees. My student room isn't well ventilated, and while it may be great this winter coming, I don't want to experience the sweat fest that the last few summers have been with this pc.  
 
Also, a replacement GPU isn't an immediate grab, but I think i'll be in the market for something soon, as my 7970 was purchased 2nd hand from a bitcoin miner, and now after a few years of use, is slowly starting to die, as random screen tearing, sudden display crashes, crazy flashing during running fullscreen programs, even such as youtube, which never happened when i first got the card.  
 
If someone could squeeze something more powerful and modern into the budget along with the new cpu/mobo/ram combo. I mentioned the 970 my friend is offering, but I don't know if its worth it, or what I need. If it helps, if i could've found a New RX 570 at RRP (UK around £180) I would've gotten that, and gone over budget.  
 
Don't know if I left anything out, but it might be worth mentioning I have no brand loyalty, or favourites on Intel vs AMD, or nVidia vs radeon (I can't afford to). Just the best value for money, and I'm not afraid of second hand purchases, which is why you will see so much come up through what i've listed.  
 
If anyone needs more information, just ask and i'll try to respond within 24hrs.
Thanks in advance to all the help;
submitted by wikimuncher to buildapc [link] [comments]

Just comparing the Nvidia 780Ti and the AMD R9 290X

http://www.hardocp.com/article/2013/11/11/geforce_gtx_780_ti_vs_radeon_r9_290x_4k_gaming/1
Conclusion: Though the AMD Radeon R9 290X now has competition at Ultra HD 4K display gaming, it isn't being "owned" by the GTX 780 Ti. The GTX 780 Ti, at $150 more, only equals the R9 290X. Both video cards are even, or on par with each other at Ultra HD 4K gaming.
The fact is that the Radeon R9 290X is delivering the same performance once again for a $150 savings. It takes the competition a $150 more expensive video card just to perform on par with the Radeon R9 290X. This reinforces our conclusion once again that the Radeon R9 290X is an incredible value right now. You really do get a lot of performance for your money.
http://techgage.com/article/amd-radeon-r9-290x-nvidia-geforce-gtx-780-ti-review/1/
Conclusion: if the R9 290X was being sold at this moment for $549. If that were the case, then it would be a heck of a lot more appealing. Looking at things from that perspective, we’d be talking about a card that costs $150 less than the 780 Ti. The card might then run hotter and louder, but its overall performance would help negate those cons.
At one point in time the 290X was being sold at the same price as the 780Ti only because of bitcoin miners. Well that market crashed and the 290X prices are finally down to the $549 price tag.
If you are considering the 780Ti then maybe you should look into AMD before you do.
edit: I would recommend people wait till the 880 is released. If it is on par with the 290X and costs the same get the 880. If when the 880's are released and the 290X is in the $450 I would jump on the 290X in a heart beat.
submitted by RtuDtuWork to oculus [link] [comments]

How do you think the Switch will handle Dock to Tablet and vice versa?

I'm seeing a LOT of stuff about the tablet being 720p, but I always argued that it's not a bad thing.
Going a little off topic but I think it's important enough to think about during this: I'm going to be a little optimistic and say it's around the Xbox One in realtime performance, since Nvidia can squeeze out more performance per... "flop", than AMD does, as 390X vs the GTX 970 share very similar realtime performance in games (Not computation, which seems to be AMD's strength, like bitcoin mining for example) with the 970 at 3.9TFLOPS and the 390X at nearly 6.
Proof: http://gpuboss.com/gpus/Radeon-R9-390X-vs-GeForce-GTX-970
So about the screen on the console itself and transitioning from that to the TV, and vice versa.
Nvidia said that this is a scalable SoC and had spent half a millennium of man-time developing it with it's own exclusive architecture based on (Assuming based on blog) Pascal, API and development tools. The key word is scalable.
We can assume this thing is made to dynamically change its clock speeds and rendering resolution in realtime based on power situation, this practice has been used in games like DOOM to maintain 60fps in consoles. I'm willing to bet you can't notice this when you're not trying to catch it since your time is spent enjoying the game for what it is.
This is all speculation of course since we don't know much more than the name of the system and the concept of it. Seeing the trailer, it does look like there are vents in it, but it's not that the device has active cooling, but the dock could. So the tablet could act as a full console, rendering games at 900/1080p like normal when being actively cooled by the dock while also supplying efficient power without it losing charge from running the chip at the best it can. Now when it's undocked. It's easy to say only the framebuffer can just switch to 720p to fit the tablet, but that also means the battery life could be poor and the device would run hot. I'm against that idea because it simply doesn't make sense and it's too simple for Nvidia to invest all that research and development into.
This could also be Nintendo's choice of using 720p for the screen. An important thing to point out is Pixels Per Inch. 720p is perfectly fine for gaming on a screen that small. People will argue about the fact that 1080p should have been used, blah blah blah, my phone has this, my tablet has that. Phones and tablets are made for reading text, yes you can play games on them, but that's not their only specific purpose. Plus, a higher PPI simply means a clearer and sharper image at lower resolutions for smaller screens. That's why the iPhone 5/5S/SE look perfectly clear at 1136x640, because of the PPI, and yes, I've owned phones with much higher PPI, one being the LG G3 what rendered in 2K. The SE still looks clear.
So I'm thinking the device like I said will operate as what we're used to when docked, when you were to take it out of the dock, the tablet will change to a portable mode. This will likely switch rendering resolution to 720p maximum, and will scale as far down as 854x480, though I'm hoping for Vita's resolution of 960x540 as the absolute minimum. I know that sounds horrible, but again, look at the screen size. Games will still perform just as well as they do docked, and going down to 720p alone will save a lot of power so 540p will probably be rare. A LOT of past gen games rendered at 1024x600, Call of Duty, and even Halo 3 rendered in 540p, but you're looking at a very small screen, not a 60 inch 1080p display. You can underclock the SoC dynamically as a developer based on the resolution and maintain the same console performance but at a lower image quality to simply save battery life. If you're getting the same console resolution and performance on the go, you might as well never undock the damn thing because you won't be using it for long. If you were to look at a 540p resolution on a native 720p display on a screen that small, that's like looking at a 720p image on a 1080p display. We're okay with playing 3DS games in 240p, so I don't think there's much reason to go off at the resolution of this device.
A little bonus speculation though it doesn't seem likely, I'm hoping the tablet screen will have an evolved and cheaper solution of Gsync, so incase of frame rate drops, the gameplay will always be fluid, but I think the hardware will use battery so if the case is to preserve battery, I don't think it'll happen.
Sorry if this was very rambled and ranty since this was written with not much time on my hands. lol How do you guys think the Switch will handle dock and undocked modes?
EDIT: My only worry is the library getting split, but I think we'll be pleasantly surprised come January with all that third party support. That list I heard was only some of the support. They have to have gone hands on with the dev kits before making their decision, and there are pretty surprising devs supporting like FromSoft.
submitted by TyMiles2012 to NintendoSwitch [link] [comments]

Which Dell Inspiron 15R SE config should I get? Or is there a better model? [$900-$1200]

Summary of the questionnaire: Looking for a 15" 1080p Ivy Bridge desktop replacement. Gaming doesn't matter, but compiling software and encoding/playing videos is. Most high-end laptops have "good enough" raw performance, so I care about details like the keyboard layout and available ports.
I've made a chart with my current laptop, minimum requirements for a new one, and comparing some possible models to buy. I'm leaning towards the Dell Inspiron 15R Special Edition, but have a couple of questions:
LAPTOP QUESTIONNAIRE
Would you pay a premium for something that has:
List any features that are critical: Ivy Bridge processor, discrete graphics card, 15" 1080p display, comfortable keyboard (I'm used to my HP Pavilion dv6700's layout), USB 3.0, VGA, HDMI, Ethernet, SD card
submitted by Rangi42 to SuggestALaptop [link] [comments]

[Build Help] $1500 gamer, multi-screen capability, with some scryptcoin mining/protein folding/video editing on the side

I tried this in /buildapcforme and didn't get any response, but I don't think I need help from scratch since I already have an idea of what I want in terms of parts, so here's a shortened copypaste:
Uses:
Budget: As cheap as possible. I'll go over no more than $2000 if need be for the triple-monitor capability.
Will you be overclocking? If yes, are you interested in overclocking right away, or down the line? CPU and/or GPU?
If there's any specific features you want/need from the rig, please list them.
Do you have any specific case preferences such as a window or LEDs, or do you have a preference for low-noise components?
Extra info:
Here's my blind foray example build:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks
Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor $319.99 @ SuperBiiz
CPU Cooler Corsair H55 57.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $54.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI Z87-G45 Gaming ATX LGA1150 Motherboard $146.13 @ Newegg
Memory Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory $59.99 @ Newegg
Storage Kingston SSDNow V300 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk $79.76 @ Amazon
Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.98 @ OutletPC
Video Card Asus Radeon R9 280X 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) $319.99 @ B&H
Video Card Asus Radeon R9 280X 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) $319.99 @ B&H
Case Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case $54.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair Enthusiast 850W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $104.99 @ Newegg
Optical Drive Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer $19.98 @ OutletPC
Total
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available. $1520.77
Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-12-25 05:31 EST-0500
With that build, what are your thoughts on the 2x R9 280x's? I'm having trouble finding comparable benchmarks, other than this which only compares it to lower-scoring GPUs. I see them as providing a fair amount of number crunching capability (aka mining), as well as being still top-of-the-line graphics for gaming. I probably shouldn't concern myself with mining if I can get a better performance out of games with a single GPU for less $.
I've never SLI'd or CF'd and everywhere I see it mentioned, I notice people have problems with it or that it doesn't always work. What should I know about multi-GPU setups?
I notice a lot of budget builds use an AMD CPU. How much can I expect out of the 4770k over a similar AMD cpu like the FX-9590 or 8350 (a much cheaper one), aside from the marginal chance in benchmark scores?
I could save getting a cheaper PSU probably.
I live near a Microcenter. I'm guessing their prices are lower for pickups.
Sorry for the long post. I hope it doesn't scare anyone off! I'm just not going to drop $1,500 without properly educating myself first.
Thanks!
submitted by kawfey to buildapc [link] [comments]

Eobot.com FAQ

FAQ https://www.eobot.com/new.aspx?referid=94984
General Questions What is a Bitcoin? Good question; see www.bitcoin.org for more information.
What are your options to withdraw? We currently only allow withdrawals in BTC/LTC/BC/NMC/DOGE/XRP/DRK/RDD/BTS/CURE/PPC/NXT/SYS.
Why can't I deposit or withdraw "real currency", aka fiat (USD/EUJPY/GBP/CNY/RUB/etc.)? Due to international law, we do not allow you to deposit or withdraw fiat currencies. In the USA, there are MSB and FinCen regulations; in Europe, certain countries have banned cryptocurrencies, and in China, the banks aren't allowed to transfer cryptocurrencies. The laws may change in the future.
Why does my "Total Cryptocurrency Value" go down? This is because that display is tied to the exchange rates on other websites. Also see this user generated YouTube video for more information: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GucqlMuIXMg
Are their any fees to join or monthly fees? No fees.
Do you speak Spanish/Russian/Chinese? No, only English, but Google Translator works well.
What are the maximums/minimums for withdrawing? There are no maximums. The minimums are small, see the withdraw page for details.
Where can I see the terms and conditions? Please click here for terms and conditions.
Where can I see the privacy policy? Please click here for privacy policy.
Are you hiring? We are always looking for quality talent. If you would like to contribute, then please send your cover letter and resume to [email protected].
Do you have a bug bounty program? Yes, we pay for bugs, so contact us for details or visit us at CrowdCurity.com and submit bugs there!
Do you perform off-chain transactions? No we do not. All cryptocurrencies are sent, usually including miner fees, and can be seen on the blockchain for that respective cryptocurrency. This helps secure the network, makes our transactions transparent, provides an easier way to debug and track down coins, and reduces the chance for fraud. An off-chain transaction would be like what Coinbase could do if both users are Coinbase users and they change coins from one email to another, mark it in the database, and Bitcoin is never actually sent from one wallet to another.
Why does my balance reset after refreshing the page or changing cryptocurrencies? The server updates every 60 seconds and the balances you see updating in real-time are performed with Javascript. If you change pages quickly, or choose a new cryptocurrency, then it will look like it is resetting. However nothign is lost, as whatever cryptocurrency it is set at when the server updates will get the past 60 seconds of mining results.
Help! My account was hacked and withdraws are being made? Eobot is a secure site and has never been compromised. If your account was hacked, then you should change your password, turn on 2FA, and turn on email notifications. There are many unscrupulous Bitcoin sites, and most likely, you used the same password on another site. Never re-use passwords!
Do you have any wallpapers? Yes, you can download wallpaper1 or wallpaper2. Feel free to send us your own creations.
What does Eobot stand for? We have heard everything, let us know your favorite, including: Earn Online Bot, Earn Online Bitcoins Online Tool, Earn Online By Our Tech.
Is this legal? We cannot provide legal advice; make sure cryptocurrencies are legal in your jurisdiction before continuing to use Eobot.
Cloud Mining Questions What are the Cloud Mining fees? For electricity and maintenance, we currently charge a fee of 65% for SHA-256 and 65% for Scrypt. These values will change as difficulty increases, exchange rates change, and newer ASICs come online. These fees are better than our competitors, for instance CEX.IO charges $0.105 per GHS, which is a 81% fee! While GAW charges a 96% fee at current prices!
How long are the Cloud Mining rentals and contracts? Prior to October 11 2014, GHS/KHS contracts had no expiration. Old contracts are not affected. New contracts and rentals, mined or purchased after October 11 2014, are now limited in term for 5 years going forward. See your History tab for expiration dates.
Can I sell my Cloud Mining? No, you cannot sell the cloud shares at this time. This is because we own the hardware and do not want to be stuck if everyone decides to sell at once.
Can I buy Cloud Mining with credit card/USD? Yes, but please keep in mind you cannot sell or convert the Cloud Mining.
Can I buy Cloud Mining with cryptocurrency? Yes, deposit the cryptocurrency and then convert it to your choice of Cloud Mining.
What are the maximums/minimums when making a credit card purchase to buy Cloud Mining? The minimum is 1.0 GHS and 10.0 KHS and there is no maximum at this time.
Can I buy a Cloud Mining that mines in Scrypt? You can use the Cloud Mining SHA-256 hashing power to mine other currencies by automatically converting them as you mine, but the earnings will still be tied to SHA-256/Bitcoin difficulty, not Scrypt/Litecoin difficulty.
What is the difference between Cloud Mining SHA-256 and Cloud Mining Scrypt? One is tied to the difficulty in mining SHA-256 cryptocurrency (Bitcoin) and the other is tied to the difficulty in mining Scrypt cryptocurrency (Litecoin). This means that if history is any indication of the future, then the Cloud Mining Scrypt won't decrease as fast as the Cloud Mining SHA-256.
What does 1 instance of Cloud Mining SHA-256 and Cloud Mining Scrypt equal? 1 of Cloud SHA-256 equates to 1.0 GHS of SHA-256 mining power, while 1 of Cloud Scrypt equates to 1 KHS of Scrypt mining power.
Can I change the pool that my Cloud mines on? No, you cannot; this may change in the future.
What hardware is behind the Cloud Mining? The hardware varies from custom ASICs to GPUs. The ASICs are behind the SHA-256 and the GPUs are behind the Scrypt.
Can I RDP (remote desktop) into my Cloud Mining? No, you cannot at this time; we will run the servers for you.
What is the Cloud Mining Pre-Order? These are the same as the other Cloud Mining, but they will start mining on a later date. For instance, a Cloud Mining Pre-Order October 2014 will start mining on October 1, 2014.
Software/Miner Questions Why is it stuck on "initializing...please wait 5 minutes"? We recently changed our Scrypt pool, so this messge will show and the stats and speed won't show under your account. See pool info page for more info.
Why does it show as a trojan/virus? This is a false-positive that many of the popular antivirus programs report. For now you can ignore it, or try another free antivirus, like Microsoft Security Essentials. Hackers use something similar programs to make money off of people's computers, so that is why it shows up as a virus.
Why does Chrome block the download as malicious? This is another false-positive. Simply, go to your Chrome settings, scroll to the bottom and click on "Show Advanced Settings". Go to the Privacy section and uncheck "Enable phishing and malware protection". You will only do this temporarily. Then proceed to download our software. Then return to your privacy settings and recheck Enable Phishing to further protect you.
Do you have a Mac or Linux version? Yes, see the Pool Info under the Account page.
How do I use cgminer? See this English PDF tutorial for cgminer, or Spanish version, created by one of our members, for a simple walk-through.
How can I increase the speed? Important to increase speed: The default cgminer settings do not include hardware specific flags, which you may find here in the Litecoin Mining Hardware Comparison. Failing to use the proper flags can result in performance decreases in excess of 50%.
What do the intensity settings relate to? This is the same as cgminer flag --intensity. Low is 11, normal is none, high is 15, very high is 17, extreme is 19.
Can I use one account for multiple computers on same IP address? Yes, it will add your speed/rates together, you can use as many computers as you want.
Can I connect to the pool manually, through cgminer or bfgminer? Yes, see the Pool Info under the Account page.
Do you use Bitcoin and Litecoin? Yes, we are the easiest miner to use with BTC and LTC and convert on the backend automatically.
What do you use on the backend? We use cgminer, bfgminer, pooler's CPU miner, and a variety of pools.
Can I mine any cryptocurrency? Yes, regardless if you use SHA-256 or Scrypt (BTC vs LTC mode), you can earn and mine any cryptocurrency.
Can I use an ASIC? Yes, simply choose the option and run as GPU mode. Devices that work with bfgminer will work, for instance USB Block Eruptors or Butterfly Labs ASICs. You can also contact us for pool information for other ASICs.
What is the best graphics card/computer to buy? Either use a high end ATI Radeon card, or buy one of the USB Block Eruptor devices on Ebay/Amazon or a similar online store.
What drivers do I need for USB mode? http://www.silabs.com/products/mcu/Pages/USBtoUARTBridgeVCPDrivers.aspx
Why doesn't GPU mode work? You may need to download the OpenCL drivers; get them from here: http://developer.nvidia.com/opencl
Where can I get the .NET framework? Try Windows Update, or use Microsoft Web Platform Installer.
Can I use a proxy server? Yes, edit intensity.txt and put the details in there, for example, add "--proxy=http://mycompany-http-proxy:8080"
Where can I download the software? Download from link here
Can I use custom flags/change intensity? Yes, you can put in whatever custom flags/parameters/arguments you want. Edit the "resources/intensity.txt" file. Put in whatever you want, like for GPU mode: "--intensity 12 --shaders 1024" or for CPU mode (number of threads): "-t 32"
submitted by KryptosBit to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Modest < $1,500 Gamer, Scrypt mining on the side, with dual/triple monitor capability.

What will you be doing with this PC? Be as specific as possible.
What is your maximum budget before rebates/shipping/taxes?
When do you plan on building/buying the PC?
What, exactly, do you need included in the budget? OS, peripherals, wifi, in addition to the tower.
Which country will you be purchasing the parts in? If you're in US, do you have a Microcenter?
If reusing any parts (including peripherals), what parts will you be reusing? Brands and models are appreciated.
Will you be overclocking? If yes, are you interested in overclocking right away, or down the line? CPU and/or GPU?
If there's any specific features you want/need from the rig, please list them.
Do you have any specific case preferences such as a window or LEDs, or do you have a preference for low-noise components?
Do you already have a legit and reusable/transferable OS key/license? If yes, what OS?
Extra info:
Here's my blind foray example build:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks
Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor $319.99 @ SuperBiiz
CPU Cooler Corsair H55 57.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $54.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI Z87-G45 Gaming ATX LGA1150 Motherboard $146.13 @ Newegg
Memory Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory $59.99 @ Newegg
Storage Kingston SSDNow V300 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk $79.76 @ Amazon
Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.98 @ OutletPC
Video Card Asus Radeon R9 280X 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) $319.99 @ B&H
Video Card Asus Radeon R9 280X 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) $319.99 @ B&H
Case Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case $54.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair Enthusiast 850W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $104.99 @ Newegg
Optical Drive Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer $19.98 @ OutletPC
Total
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available. $1520.77
Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-12-25 05:31 EST-0500
Wow, that was really long. I've been wanting a PC for such a long time now, and the Christmas spirit has inspired me to go for it.
submitted by kawfey to buildapcforme [link] [comments]

[Build Help] Adapting an existing NVidia system for bitcoins ...and more?

So I hwipped up what amounts to approximately my current build. I'm running on an ASRock 890FX Deluxe3, they don't sell those anymore so I couldn't include it in the markup.
Part list permalink / Part price breakdown by merchant
Type Item Price
CPU AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor $134.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1333 Memory $54.99 @ Newegg
Hard Drive Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 460 1GB Video Card $167.13 @ Mac Connection
Case Antec Nine Hundred Two V3 ATX Mid Tower Case $107.73 @ Mac Connection
Power Supply SeaSonic 620W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply $104.99 @ Amazon
Total
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.) $629.82
So I've been looking into bitcoins lately, and my wonderful 460 that plays bfbc2 max settings over 100 fps so smoothly gets a sad, sad 65 Mhash.
This rig is great for gaming, I have no issues with getting high framerates. The cooling situation isn't awesome, but plenty safe.
Anyway, the meat of the question here I'm interested in getting an AMD card... maybe two. The board can do crossfire! I was originally planning to SLI but the board won't do that.
Looking primarily at 20 popular mining cards, I'm interested in going with a 5850 (especially since it seems on par with the 460) and expanding to more down the road, but I haven't been able to find one for the price listed! I've seen a few up near $300, not worth it. Clearly, lots of miners have been buying these in bulk so the demand is high making the price go up. Lame.
I know the 6950 is "the card" right now as far as buildapc references go, but what would be good for hashing ~$150/card? I thought the 6770 would be good as it's ~$100 (and there are lots of options at newegg, but I'm told it is last gen and not worth getting. I'm a bit worried as the Anandtech benches don't even list the 6770. While the 6970 isn't listed on Anandtech either, it is a similar price for the same amount of stream processors but at a faster 256 memory interface.
Going up to the 6850 seems like 20% more processors for 50% more money. I'm teetering on the thought of just going up to a very pretty looking 6870, which feels like 50% more processors for 60% more money... better idea? Then I'm just inclined to go with one of the heavily rebated 6950s which is about double the processors for double the money.
Now the weird part Can I run the new card and old together? Is it possible to have drivers for an NVidia card running the screens, and drivers for the AMD card just to hash?
Thanks for taking a look! I'm interested to hear your opinions.
submitted by Azurphax to buildapc [link] [comments]

single or double precision

How does bitcoin mining work? I see specs that are different for single and double precision, which do the miners use?
that's a significant difference in speeds for something like
http://www.amd.com/us/products/desktop/graphics/ati-radeon-hd-5000/hd-5830/pages/hd-5830-overview.aspx#2
vs
http://www.nvidia.com/object/personal-supercomputing.html
submitted by Chaseshaw to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Radion vs Nvidia gpu bit coin mining (FAILURE) Bitcoin Gold mining Hashrate  Power usage AMD RX/R9 GPU vs NVIDIA GTX 10/9 series AMD Radeon HD 7610M VS Nvidia Geforce GT 630M - YouTube 1660 ti vs RX 580 8gb Mining Profitability  Overclocks  Efficiency Why AMD is NOT Competing Against NVidia Just Yet. - RX 700 Series / PCI-E 4.0 / Arcturus

AMD Radeon 530 vs NVIDIA GeForce GT 740M. Comparative analysis of AMD Radeon 530 and NVIDIA GeForce GT 740M videocards for all known characteristics in the following categories: Essentials, Technical info, Video outputs and ports, Compatibility, dimensions and requirements, API support, Memory, Technologies. Radeon RX Vega 8 Radeon RX Vega 10 Radeon RX Vega 3 GeForce MX230 GeForce MX110 GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Popular CPUs Ryzen 5 3500U A6-9225 Ryzen Threadripper 3990X A9-9425 Ryzen 3 3200U Ryzen 7 3700U Nvidia is simpler to mine with. AMD you have to mess with so many settings to get things right. You wouldn't mine Bitcoin directly with either of those cards, you'd mine an alt coin or use nicehash to "rent" out your hash for btc. If you aren't paying for electricity, it's worth it you'll eventually earn the cards value back. Nvidia’s RTX 3080 and 3090 just launched and, for now, don’t have much competition — but that should soon change, as AMD will announce its next-generation Radeon hardware on October 28. Die Radeon RX 580 lässt sich von 1.340 MHz ab Werk um maximal 635 MHz auf 705 MHz untertakten, mehr ist nicht möglich. Mit einem GPU-Takt von nur 705 MHz berechnet die Radeon-Grafikkarte jedoch ...

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Radion vs Nvidia gpu bit coin mining (FAILURE)

AMD May not competing against NVidia just yet as their roadmap shows a piece of information that overlays one of the potential problems AMD and NVidia's Graphics cards are actually sharing. The ... Ethereum mining Hashrate & Power consumption on RX 5700 XT RX VEGA 56 RX VEGA 64 RTX 2080 RTX 2080 Ti GTX 1080 Ti 1080 1070 1060 1050 Ti 98... Ethereum was initially described in a white paper by Vitalik Buterin, a programmer involved with Bitcoin, in late 2013 with a goal of building decentralized applications. Buterin had argued that ... 1660 ti vs RX 580, crypto fish,1660 ti hashrate,1660 ti benchmark,1660 ti mining hashrate,1660 ti gpu mining,1660 ti ethereum classic,1660 ti x16r,1660 ti mtp,1660 ti mining,best coin to mine with ... Bitcoin Gold mining Hashrate & Power consumption on RX VEGA 56 GTX 1080 Ti 1080 1070 1060 1050 Ti 980 Ti 980 970 960 RX 580 RX570 RX ...

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